Château de Chambord, France

Ahhh the Château de Chambord, France! So much history and design is behind this incredible building that I believe not many people know exist! First off, what is this building?

The Château de Chambord is one of the most recognizable chateaux in the world because of its very distinctive French Renaissance architecture which blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Renaissance structures. The building, which was never completed, was constructed by King Francis I of France.

via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chambord

via http://www.francethisway.com/places/chateaudechambord.php

The rooms of the early Renaissance chateaux were sparingly furnished. French Renaissance furniture kept some of the Gothic influence and was therefore heavy, characterized by much carving and most extensive ornament.

Here are some of the rooms in this beautiful building!

via http://designlike.com/2011/12/16/chateau-de-chambord-a-renaissance-chateau-in-the-heart-of-the-loire-valley-france/


Via http://museumchick.com/2010/07/chateau-chambord-loire-valley-france.html


Via http://www.bugbog.com/gallery/france-pictures-photos/Loire-Valley-Pictures/Chateau-Chenonceau-pictures.html

Okay, so these are just a couple images that are in this beautiful unfinished building! Gorgeous right?!

But what’s up with all the patterns and furniture? Let me give you a little insight on the styles that’s in this Chateuax.

French Renaissance 

French Renaissance was a culture and artistic movement that happened in France between the 15th and 17th century. Renaissance means “rebirth” and that’s exactly what was going on during this time period with all the new ideas and things happening like humanism for example.

Interior design during this time period was characterized by Gothic influences and was therefore heavy, characterized by much carving and most extensive ornament. Grotesque figures growing out of almost equally grotesque foliage spread over everything, that includes swans, dolphins, sphinxes, chimeras, griffins, and masks.

The exaggerated costume of the time brought about the caquetoire in France and the farthingale in England—a small armless chair yielding some comfort to women. The credenza and an Italian form of double cabinet known as the armoire, embellished with an excess of miniature classical architectural motifs, became typically French pieces.


via http://denoxa.com/

Armoire

via http://homes-kid.com/french-renaissance-furniture.html

Ornamentation

via https://www.pinterest.com/daniellevillica/renaissance-ornament/

Here is a general color scheme of the French Renaissance!

via http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/colortherapy-a-1-24882

Well, there you have it! The Château de Chambord, France is on my bucket list!

Don’t forget to follow me on Pinterest!

https://www.pinterest.com/schoeabi/

Let’s Go Back in Time…

Let’s take a trip! We’re going to travel back in time to the past centuries and all over the world and take a look at castles, designs and so much more!

First stop…

“Château de Noisy” Castle – Celles, Belgium

  

This beautiful structure was built in 1866 by English architect Edward Miner during the French Revolution. After taken over in WWII by  the National Railway Company of Belgium, it was turned into an orphanage. This castle has been empty since 1991.

What’s Inside? 

Image via https://www.pinterest.com/pin/498281146243799259/

Image via http://www.pinstopin.com/chateau-de-noisy-celles-belgium/

Image via https://www.flickr.com/photos/tuckerphotography/8517377102

Next stop…

Benneth College – New York

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Bennett College was founded in 1890 at Irvington, New York by May F. Bennett. In 1907 the college moved to its final home on 22 acres (89,000 m2) in Millbrook, Dutchess County, New York. In 1907 the school had an enrollment of 120 students and a faculty of 29. Originally named The Bennett School for Girls, the course of study was six years (four years of high school and two years of higher study). In the early 20th century the school discontinued high school courses and became a junior college only. The two-year curriculum continued through the 1970s. Generations of young women from prominent American families attended Bennett over its 90-year history.[1]

Majors of study included art, fashion design, interior design, music, modern languages, literature, history, dance, drama, child development, equine studies, and domestic science. Activities at Bennett included gymnastics, golf, tennis, horseback riding and skiing. The school was home to a full-time teaching Nursery School for 3 and 4 year old as well as a riding stable.

At the time of its closing, enrollment was around 300 students.

via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennett_College_%28New_York%29

What’s Inside?

circa 1907

Image via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennett_College_(New_York)

Image via http://www.andymilford.com/new-york-show-921/

Last stop!…

“Champollion House”, The Palace of prince Said Halim – Cairo, Egypt

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Said Halim was a Pasha and grandson of Muhammad Ali of Egypt. He was born in 1865 and served as the Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire from 1913 to 1917. He is considered by some as the founder of modern Egypt. He was assassinated in 1921 by an Armenian Revolutionary Federation agent, Arshavir Shirakian for his alleged role in the Armenian Genocide.

During his time, Said Halim Pasha asked Antonio Lasciac to design him a palace in 1899. The architecture was grandiose and included Baroque influences with classical arches and much expense with materials imported from Italy.

he 19th century palace of Said Halim Pasha was confiscated by the British during World War I, in which Said Halim was sided with the Ottoman – German alliance. It was then transformed in the Al-Nassiriyah Secondary School for Boys. The backyard gardens and marble fountains and trees would later be removed with apartment buildings put up on the former spot.

via http://www.wuhwild.com/abandoned-said-halim-pasha-palace-champollion-house-in-egypt/

What’s Inside?

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Images via http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/abandoned-mansion-egypt-jan-2009.t36808

What incredible places! I personally find the most beauty in the oldest places and these are nothing short of that 🙂

Don’t forget to follow me on Pinterest! 

https://www.pinterest.com/schoeabi/